Please Help Support These Organizations Serving the Homeless in SF!

Artists Christopher Statton and Megan Wilson are creating a limited edition of 300 sets of "Home" signs to benefit three organizations -  The Gubbio Project, the Coalition on Homelessness, and At The Crossroads that are working to help ease the suffering of those living on the streets, treating people with dignity, respect and love, and being at the forefront of changing the inhumane policies that have been enacted to criminalize and punish those who are already faced with such overwhelming challenges. The signs are available for purchase for $100/pair. The purchasers receive one sign and the other sign is donated to one of the three partner organizations to use as they see best fit (e.g. the Gubbio Project will place them on the pews of St. Boniface Church). Purchasers will also be provided with more information on each of the organizations and how they can further help.

All of the proceeds will be divided evenly and go to these critically needed organizations.

Signs can be purchased online at our BetterHomesAndGardensToday.org Website: HERE!

  • There are only 1,300 shelter beds in San Francisco and, according to the January 2013 homeless count, 7,350 people are without homes. And while the City reports vacancies in the shelters each night, 2 out of 3 people seeking shelter are turned away.
  • Places to rest during the day legally are equally as difficult to come by. In the past 12 years in San Francisco, 167,074 citations were given out for sleeping and sitting in public (San Francisco Municipal Court). Each citation carries a fine of $100. An unpaid or unresolved ticket goes to warrant in 21 days, and the fine doubles. Accumulated warrants can result in incarceration and denial of affordable housing.
  • In 2014, a United Nations panel deemed the Sit/Lie ordinance a form of human rights abuse.
  • A 2012 report released by San Francisco's City Hall Fellows found that San Francisco’s Sit/Lie ordinance has been unequivocally ineffective, citing that the reported citations were issued to the same 19 offenders, who were reported as chronically homeless and incapable of paying the $100 fines.
  • One of the most overlooked, yet greatest health risks for the homeless is the lack of sleep. San Diego-based blogger and self-proclaimed “chronic homeless man” Kevin Barbieux, who writes under the name The Homeless Guy states in the articleHomelessness and the Impossibility of a Good Night’s Sleep by Hanna Brooks Olsen in the August 2014 issue of The Atlanticthat “Without a doubt, sleep is the biggest issue for homeless people …homeless advocates are always focused on what are believed to be the root causes of homelessness, and providing the basics of food shelter and clothing to those who do without, and although those things are important in their own way, they don't affect homeless people with the intensity that sleep does (or the lack thereof).” Additionally, acute problems such as infections, injuries, and pneumonia are difficult to heal when there is no place to rest and recuperate.
  • Another critical health concern for the homeless is the growing rate of hate crimes. Over the past 15 years, the National Coalition on Homelessness (NCH) has recorded 1,437 incidents of crimes committed against the homeless by housed individuals. In 2013 alone, the NCH became aware of 109 attacks, 18 of which resulted in death. The highest percentage of attacks (30%) took place in California. It is important to note that people experiencing homelessness are often treated so poorly by society that attacks are forgotten of unreported. This reality worsens when one considers that many violent acts against homeless populations go unreported and therefore, the true number of incidents is likely to be substantially higher.

All people, especially those who are living on the streets or have mental health or substance abuse issues, are worthy of respect, dignity, and loving kindness.